bicycle leans against brick wall. The entire bike is painted bright yellos, including a pile of books sitting beside it.

10 Ways Writing Is Like Riding A Bicycle… Sort Of.

I must start by admitting that I do not ride a bicycle. I OWN a bicycle. Because they were on sale at Costco on a Saturday morning when I was apparently feeling athletic.

But I don’t actually RIDE the bicycle. Truthfully, the seat is tiny and it hurts my lady parts. Also, I look ridiculous in a helmet. And I never learned all the silly hand signals so veering through city streets seems unwise.

I definitely write more than I bike. Writing causes no lady-pain, has no helmet requirement, and is unlikely to result in a traffic collision, so it’s naturally more appealing to me.

Plus, I’m a professional writer, so folks pay for my words. To date, no one has offered money to watch me pedal my Costco bicycle around the block.

Anyhoo…

Writing is obviously NOT the same as riding a bicycle. But there are enough similarities to make some solid analogies. And as a writer, I love analogies.

So, without further ado…

Here are 10 ways writing is like riding a bicycle:

  1. Once you learn, you never forget.
  2. If you don’t do it for a while – and then you start again – it can feel a bit wobbly.
  3. It’s harder to do when you’re tired.
  4. It’s harder to do when you’re in a bad mood. But sometimes you go faster when you’re angry.
  5. You may huff and puff a bit at first. But once you find your rhythm it becomes less effort.
  6. It’s nerve-wracking. Sometimes.
  7. It’s blissful. Sometimes.
  8. There’s always someone who’s a little faster than you are.
  9. There’s always someone who makes it look easy. And never seems to huff and puff.
  10. Sometimes the motivation to do it kicks in AFTER you start doing it.

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Kim Scaravelli

Kim Scaravelli

Kim Scaravelli is a brand voice coach, writer, and author Making Words Work. She lives in Halifax, Nova Scotia, with her unruly family, a sweet dog named Stevie, and a sarcastic cat named Winnie.